Great Wall of China

Great Wall of China


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The Great Wall of China is an ancient series of walls and fortifications, totaling more than 13,000 miles in length, located in northern China. Perhaps the most recognizable symbol of China and its long and vivid history, the Great Wall was originally conceived by Emperor Qin Shi Huang in the third century B.C. as a means of preventing incursions from barbarian nomads. The best-known and best-preserved section of the Great Wall was built in the 14th through 17th centuries A.D., during the Ming dynasty. Though the Great Wall never effectively prevented invaders from entering China, it came to function as a powerful symbol of Chinese civilization’s enduring strength.

Qin Dynasty Construction

Though the beginning of the Great Wall of China can be traced to the fifth century B.C., many of the fortifications included in the wall date from hundreds of years earlier, when China was divided into a number of individual kingdoms during the so-called Warring States Period.

Around 220 B.C., Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of a unified China under the Qin Dynasty, ordered that earlier fortifications between states be removed and a number of existing walls along the northern border be joined into a single system that would extend for more than 10,000 li (a li is about one-third of a mile) and protect China against attacks from the north.

Construction of the “Wan Li Chang Cheng,” or 10,000-Li-Long Wall, was one of the most ambitious building projects ever undertaken by any civilization. The famous Chinese general Meng Tian initially directed the project, and was said to have used a massive army of soldiers, convicts and commoners as workers.

Made mostly of earth and stone, the wall stretched from the China Sea port of Shanhaiguan over 3,000 miles west into Gansu province. In some strategic areas, sections of the wall overlapped for maximum security (including the Badaling stretch, north of Beijing, that was later restored during the Ming Dynasty).

From a base of 15 to 50 feet, the Great Wall rose some 15-30 feet high and was topped by ramparts 12 feet or higher; guard towers were distributed at intervals along it.

Great Wall of China Through the Centuries

With the death of Qin Shi Huang and the fall of the Qin Dynasty, much of the Great Wall fell into disrepair. After the fall of the later Han Dynasty, a series of frontier tribes seized control in northern China. The most powerful of these was the Northern Wei Dynasty, which repaired and extended the existing wall to defend against attacks from other tribes.

The Bei Qi kingdom (550–577) built or repaired more than 900 miles of wall, and the short-lived but effective Sui Dynasty (581–618) repaired and extended the Great Wall of China a number of times.

With the fall of the Sui and the rise of the Tang Dynasty, the Great Wall lost its importance as a fortification, as China had defeated the Tujue tribe to the north and expanded past the original frontier protected by the wall.

During the Song Dynasty, the Chinese were forced to withdraw under threat from the Liao and Jin peoples to the north, who took over many areas on both sides of the Great Wall. The powerful Yuan (Mongol) Dynasty (1206-1368), established by Genghis Khan, eventually controlled all of China, parts of Asia and sections of Europe.

Though the Great Wall held little importance for the Mongols as a military fortification, soldiers were assigned to man the wall in order to protect merchants and caravans traveling along the lucrative Silk Road trade routes established during this period.

Wall Building During the Ming Dynasty

Despite its long history, the Great Wall of China as it is exists today was constructed mainly during the mighty Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).

Like the Mongols, the early Ming rulers had little interest in building border fortifications, and wall building was limited before the late 15th century. In 1421, the Ming emperor Yongle proclaimed China’s new capital, Beijing, on the site of the former Mongol city of Dadu.

Under the strong hand of the Ming rulers, Chinese culture flourished, and the period saw an immense amount of construction in addition to the Great Wall, including bridges, temples and pagodas.

The construction of the Great Wall as it is known today began around 1474. After an initial phase of territorial expansion, Ming rulers took a largely defensive stance, and their reformation and extension of the Great Wall was key to this strategy.

The Ming wall extended from the Yalu River in Liaoning Province to the eastern bank of the Taolai River in Gansu Province, and winded its way from east to west through today’s Liaoning, Hebei, Tianjin, Beijing, Inner Mongolia, Shanxi, Shaanxi, Ningxia and Gansu.

Starting west of Juyong Pass, the Great Wall was split into south and north lines, respectively named the Inner and Outer Walls. Strategic “passes” (i.e., fortresses) and gates were placed along the wall; the Juyong, Daoma and Zijing passes, closest to Beijing, were named the Three Inner Passes, while further west were Yanmen, Ningwu and Piantou, the Three Outer Passes.

All six passes were heavily garrisoned during the Ming period and considered vital to the defense of the capital.

Significance of the Great Wall of China

In the mid-17th century, the Manchus from central and southern Manchuria broke through the Great Wall and encroached on Beijing, eventually forcing the fall of the Ming Dynasty and beginning of the Qing Dynasty.

Between the 18th and 20th centuries, the Great Wall emerged as the most common emblem of China for the Western world, and a symbol both physical – as a manifestation of Chinese strength – and a psychological representation of the barrier maintained by the Chinese state to repel foreign influences and exert control over its citizens.

Today, the Great Wall is generally recognized as one of the most impressive architectural feats in human history. In 1987, UNESCO designated the Great Wall a World Heritage site, and a popular claim that emerged in the 20th century holds that it is the only manmade structure that is visible from space.

Over the years, roadways have been cut through the wall in various points, and many sections have deteriorated after centuries of neglect. The best-known section of the Great Wall of China – Badaling, located 43 miles (70 km) northwest of Beijing – was rebuilt in the late 1950s, and attracts thousands of national and foreign tourists every day.


How Was the Great Wall of China Built? | History and Legends

Building The Great Wall of China remains one of the most incredible feats of engineering the world has ever seen.

B ecause the Great Wall of China was constructed by different dynasties over the past two millennia, it’s difficult to condense the timeline into a single story. The history is different depending on:

Throughout the centuries, construction techniques naturally grew more advanced as different dynasties repaired and built on the earlier walls.

In fact, a careful study of the history of the Great Wall of China alone can provide good answers to the question how was the Great Wall of China built. It’s an interesting look at the evolution of Chinese construction design and methods.

  • The Modern Great Wall: Most people conjure up images of the mighty stone edifices near Beijing. These modern Ming-era walls were built during the 15th and 16th centuries and are by far the most impressive and reflect the most advanced construction techniques and materials.
  • The Early Great Wall: The early sections of the Wall, first built 2,000 years ago, were naturally much less sophisticated and sturdy. The vast majority of these early sections of the wall have disappeared after so many centuries of erosion.

How was the Great Wall of China built? Whether you plan to visit the Great Wall of China or you’re just doing research, here is the history, facts and legends surrounding the construction.


The great wall of china info.

It is considered one of the greatest engineering feats ever accomplished. Built as a defense against nomadic invaders from the north, the Great Wall is now a vital part of China&rsquos tourism economy.

Like the dragon symbol of China, the great wall of china slithers through grasslands, deserts, over plateaus, and mountains. Famous parts of the wall display an incredible variety of scenery which tourists enjoy through the full length of the journey. The wall climbs and descends through gorges with rivers below and spectacular scenery. Panoramic views of picturesque lakes and dramatic mountain vistas mark all aspects of a walk along the wall. The Great Wall sets a grand architectural standard and displays undeniable historical meaning.

In 1987, UNESCO, designated The Great Wall of China as a World Heritage. Then in 2001 a Swiss corporation, &ldquoNew7Wonders Foundation&rdquo, started an initiative, choose the New Seven Wonders of the World. The Chinese government and people were proud to have The Wall make the list of seven. The portion of The Great Wall that exists today was mostly constructed during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644.) These parts of the wall begin in Hushan in the east, crossing through Liaoning, Hebei, Beijing, Tianjin, Shanxi, Inner Mongolia, Nigxia, Shaanxi, Gansu, and Qinghai, ending in Jiayuguan Pass to the west.

The Badaling section of the wall is considered the most representative part and is the best preserved section of the wall. This section is located 43 miles north of Beijing, China and is easy to reach by bus or taxi. The Badaling section is the most popular with tourists and draws close to two million visitors each year.


Reviving the great wall concept

The Great Wall concept was revived again under the Ming in the 14th century, and following the Ming army's defeat by the Oirats in the Battle of Tumu. The Ming had failed to gain a clear upper hand over the Mongolian tribes after successive battles, and the long-drawn conflict was taking a toll on the empire. The Ming adopted a new strategy to keep the nomadic tribes out by constructing walls along the northern border of China. Acknowledging the Mongol control established in the Ordos Desert, the wall followed the desert's southern edge instead of incorporating the bend of the Yellow River.


Elaborating on the History and Timeline of the Great Wall of China

A length of 6,259 kilometers might explain the 'might' of the Great Wall of China. This is the approximate distance you would cover, if you drove between Washington DC and Las Vegas, and then back from Vegas to Texas. Let's uncover the story of the magnificent Great Wall which has been the pride of the Chinese for over 2200 years.

A length of 6,259 kilometers might explain the ‘might’ of the Great Wall of China. This is the approximate distance you would cover, if you drove between Washington DC and Las Vegas, and then back from Vegas to Texas. Let’s uncover the story of the magnificent Great Wall which has been the pride of the Chinese for over 2200 years.

The Great Wall of China is regarded as one of the greatest wonders of the world. It’s not usually that an emperor goes this far to protect his people and kingdom from the enemy. The beauty of the wall lies in the unification that it brings to the lives of the people, which is very well-reflected by the citizens of the People’s Republic of China in their spirit and will.

The wall stretches for about 6,259 kilometers from east to west. The stretch was built by slaves and prisoners of war, and also soldiers and local peasants were forced and drawn into the construction against their will. The work hours were extensive due to which many people died due to starvation and unhealthy work conditions. It is a popularly debated fact that the corpses were also used to build the wall, as human bones provide stability to a structure. An approximately 4-6 million people were put onto this mammoth task of building the wall, of which more than a million deaths have been assumed during the course of construction.

Built to its current form by multiple dynasties, it stood the test of time and had kept China safe from invasion until Genghis Khan attacked from areas where the wall construction was not continuous. During the course of time, some parts of the wall have either disappeared or are in a sorry state of affairs and expected to be down in a few decades. Let’s look at the timeline of events that led the Great Wall from being a protective barrier to becoming a wonder of the world.

The images are meant to represent the various stages of construction of the wall.

5th century BC to 221 BC

During the warring states’ period from the 5th century BC to 221 BC, the states of Qi, Yan, and Zhao constructed extensive fortifications to defend their borders. Built to withstand the attack of small arms such as swords and spears, these walls were made mostly by stamping gravel and earth between board frames.

221 BC

In order to strengthen his rule and defend the Huns in the north, Emperor Qin ordered connecting the walls once built by other states and also adding sections under his expense to strengthen the boundary. The long Qin’s wall thus started taking shape. It started from the east which is today’s Liaoning Province and ended at Lintao, Gansu Province. After subjugating and uniting China from the seven warring states, the emperor connected and extended four old fortification walls along the north of China that originated from about 700 B.C. Armies were stationed along the wall to defend the invading nomadic Hsiung Nu tribes north of China. Additions and modifications continued over the next millennium but the major construction of the ‘modern’ wall began in the Ming Dynasty and continued during their rule from 1368-1644 CE.

1368-1644 CE

The Great Wall concept was revived again during the Ming Dynasty following the Ming army’s defeat at the hands of Oirats in the Battle of Tumu in 1449. The Ming had failed to gain a clear upper hand over the Mongolian and Manchurian tribes after successive battles, and the long-drawn conflict was taking a toll on the empire. The Ming adopted a new strategy to keep the nomadic tribes out by constructing walls along the northern border of China. Acknowledging the Mongol control established in the Ordos Desert, the wall followed the desert’s southern edge instead of incorporating the bend of the Huang He. During the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), the Great Wall was enlarged to 6,400 kilometers and renovated over a 200-year period, with watchtowers and cannons added.

1644 CE

Construction and repairs of the wall were suspended. A wall was built in the south to protect the Chinese from the nomads and barbarians.

The wall as we see today, is after taking up a huge renovation of which the most important phase took place after it was declared a World Heritage Site in 1987 by UNESCO. The restoration and preservation initiatives are being taken up by the government and other non-governmental bodies like the International Friends of the Great Wall and The China Great Wall Society who clean the areas surrounding the most frequently visited areas of the wall and keep a close check on the structural maintenance.

Through Western contact with China from the 17th through 20th centuries, the fame of the Great Wall grew and so did tourism. It grew at a whopping rate after President Nixon visited the wall in 1972. Today, a portion of the Great Wall of China, about 80 km from Beijing, is host to about 6 million tourists every year.

Many historians have a view that by building a wall of this length, the manpower that went into it, and the deaths reported or assumed during the construction, it would have caused lesser casualties even if another kingdom would have attacked and gotten into a war with China. But from accounts of the Chinese, the wall stands as a representation of their unity and pride.


The Great Wall of China - History, Facts , Myths and Legends

The Great Wall of China is one of the most famous masterpiece work ever done entirely by human hand. It is also one of the most recognizable symbols of china and its long and vivid history.


History of ‘The Great Wall’ Through Centuries

The Great Wall of China is a series of walls and fortifications totaling more than 13000 miles in length. This wall was originally conceived by Emperor Qin Shi Huang in the third century B.C as a means of preventing incursions from barbarian nomads.

Around 220 B.C., Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of a unified China under the Qin Dynasty, ordered that earlier fortifications between states be removed and a number of existing walls along the northern border be joined into a single system that would protect China against attacks from the north. The famous Chinese general Meng Tian initially directed the project, and was said to have used a massive army of soldiers, convicts and commoners as workers.

When Emperor Qin Shi Huang ordered construction of the Great Wall around 221 B.C., the labor force that built the wall was made up largely of soldiers and convicts. It is said that as many as 400,000 people died during the wall's construction many of these workers were buried within the wall itself.

With the death of Qin Shi Huang and the fall of the Qin Dynasty, much of the Great Wall fell into disrepair. After the fall of the later Han Dynasty, a series of frontier tribes seized control in northern China. The most powerful of these was the Northern Wei Dynasty, which repaired and extended the existing wall to defend against attacks from other tribes.

- Chinese Name: 长城 (cháng chéng), 万里长城 (wàn lǐ cháng chéng), literally meaning ‘The Long Wall of 10,000 Miles'.

- The Great Wall of China is more than 2300 years old.

- The Great Wall is not a continuous line. There are side walls, circular walls, parallel walls and sections with no walls.

- In December 1987 The Great Wall placed on World Heritage List by UNESCO.

- The Great Wall of China is the longest structure ever built by humans.

- In the past, wall construction was a common punishment for Chinese convicts.

- Since 1644, when the Ming dynasty was overthrown no further work has been done on the great wall.

- Numerous temples were built along The Great Wall of China for the worship of the war god Guandi.

- The Great Wall of China is 25 feet high in some places and ranges from 15-30 feet wide.

- The Great Wall of China cannot be seen from space by the human eye without aid.

- A large number of workers lost their lives while building the wall.

- Roosters were brought to The Great Wall to honor the dead.
It is estimated that around 400,000 builders were died and some are said to be buried in the long wall. That gives the dreadful saying of the ‘longest cemetery’.

Myths Surrounding The Great Wall

- The Great Wall Successfully Kept Out Invaders

- The Great Wall Was Built In A Year

- The Great Wall Can Be Seen From Space

- The Wall Was Built For Beating The Mongols

- Work Has Been Done To Restore Some Parts Of The Wall

- The Wall Is Just Made Of Earth And Stone

- All Of The Great Wall Is Already Discovered

- The Great Wall Of China Is A World Wonder

Most Widely Spread Legend

- A Dragon Determined The Course Of The Wall

A legend states that a helpful dragon traced out the course of the Great Wall for the people who were building the wall. The builders followed the dragon and used his tracks to map out which way the wall would go. This is just a myth.

The Cry of Meng Jiangnu

A tragic trivia is known to every household in China. Once there was a woman named Meng Jiangnu, whose husband Fan Xiliang was forcibly recruited to help build the Great Wall just three days after their marriage. Meng missed her husband so much that she decided to visit him. When she arrived at the building site, she was informed that Fan had died of exhaustion and been buried inside the wall. She was heart-broken and cried day and night. Finally, the wall collapsed and exposed her husband’s bones.

Some Fun Facts

- A wheel barrow whose invention is credited to Chinese was a big help in building this structure.

- Laolongtou ('Old Dragon's Head') is where the east end of the Great Wall of the Ming Dynasty meets the Bo Sea. It's part of the Shanhai Pass Great Wall defense system covering mountains, sea, plain, and town. The Great Wall at Laolongtou is like a huge dragon lying with its head on the beach and mouth in the sea. The square watchtower on the beach looks uncannily like a raised reptilian skull when viewed at a distance, along with the seaward wall extension, resembling a mouth, and the narrower landward wall resembling a neck.


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1. First and Last Construction (7th century BC - 1878)

There is a wide misconception that the Great Wall was built under the order of Emperor Qin Shi Huang (259 - 210BC), but it is not true. The fact is that the initial construction was 2,700 years ago during the Spring and Autumn Period (770 - 276BC). The fortifications built by Chu State during the 7th century BC have been proven to be the earliest Great Wall. The last construction was in 1878 in the late Qing Dynasty.

2. Not One Consistent Wall, but a Collection of Walls

The structure is not in a single long line! In fact, there is not one wall, but many walls, in the plural. It is a defensive network consisting of many walls and forts built in different historical periods, with some segments scattering while some running parallel. In some places, the wall doubles or even triples itself.

3. Completion of Such a Massive Project Originated from a Rumor

Emperor Qin Shi Huang is often referred as the initiator of the Great Wall. Actually it was he who first commanded the linking of the separate sections built by previous states. It is surprising to know that the decision for this huge project was made due to a rumor! After unifying central China and establishing the Qin Dynasty in 221BC, Emperor Qin Shi Huang wanted to consolidate his power and rule the country forever. He sent a necromancer named Lu Sheng to seek for a way of immortality. After countless empty-handed returns, Lu finally brought back a rumor that Qin would be overturned by the northern nomads. Hearing that, the Emperor was so frightened that he immediately issued an order to connect the walls and extend new ramparts to guard the northern border.

4. The Great Wall You See Today is not as Old as You Think

During the 2,500 years from 7th century BC to 19th century AD, more than 20 dynasties and states had undertaken the construction of the walls, section by section, bit by bit. Today&rsquos best-known and best-preserved walls were results from the Ming Dynasty&rsquos massive construction begun around 1381. The Ming Great Wall wound its 5,500 miles&rsquo (8,851.8 km) course from Hushan in the east to Jiayuguan in the west. Many of its sections have been renovated and developed into tourist resorts, such as Badaling and Mutianyu in Beijing, Shanhaiguan in Hebei, and Jiayuguan in Gansu. These sections that are popular with tourists are generally 400 to 600 years old.
See more about the construction history of different dynasties.

5. Famous Badaling Vs. Nameless Wild Walls

Large crowds of visitors converge on Badaling, the most well-known section 40 miles (70 km) northwest of Beijing. With best-preserved walls, stunning scenery and consummate facilities, it is the earliest section open to tourists and enjoys the highest international reputation. Out of the halo, there are many other sections of the ancient walls lying wild and nameless. In fact, the countless dilapidated sections form the majority of the entire wall.
See more about the Badaling Facts and History.

6. Is it just a &lsquoWall&rsquo?

It is named a &lsquoWall&rsquo, but actually it is not only a simple &lsquoWall&rsquo. Historical facts show that it was a comprehensive fortification, consisting of overlapping walls and trenches for blocking enemies, watchtowers and beacon towers for signals and communication, fortresses for head-on battles, and barracks to accommodate soldiers. During the Ming Dynasty, a well-designed array of fortifications such as the Three Inner Passes of Daoma, Zijing, and Juyong, and the Three Outer Passes of Pianguan, Ningwu, and Yanmen, formed a solid defense for the capital city of Beijing.

7. It was not Built for Beating back Mongols

The wall construction commenced in the 7th century BC and was first linked up to a defensive line in around 210BC, much earlier before the rise of the Mongols in 11th century AD. The original purpose was to defend against incursions by northern nomadic tribes living in today&rsquos Mongolia and north China, including successively the Hun, Xianbei, Rouran, and Tujue. Some states also built walls to repel their neighbors.

8. It didn&rsquot always Succeed in Keeping out Invasions

For thousands of years, the Great Wall to some extent acted like both a physical and mental barrier between the central Chinese Empire and the barbarian northern nomads, but this only worked for the underdog. Several strong nomadic tribes in history had managed passage across the barrier. For instance, in 13th century, the Mongols led by Genghis Khan breached the wall and subjugated north and central China for nearly 100 years in 1644, the Manchus&rsquoentering from Shanhaiguan resulted in the collapse of the Ming Dynasty.

9. Can it be Seen from the Space?

In early 19th century, the immense scale of the Wall had once given rise to a rumor that it could be seen from the moon with naked eyes. In fact, it is invisible from the space. Difficulty in observing the wall with unaided eyes from space equals that of seeing a hair from two miles away!
Further Reading: Can the Great Wall be Seen from the Space?

10. 1/3 of the Wall has Disappeared

The Great Wall is changing all the time to be specific - it is disappearing year by year. Be clear that well-maintained sections like Badaling are just a few rare exceptions. The fact is that many wall sites had fallen into disrepair and are in danger of being lost due to physical weathering and human activities. Human vandalism is the major threat. According to statistics from UNESCO, nearly one third of the walls have already disappeared. What survive today are mainly the stone and brick constructions from the Ming Dynasty. Early walls made of rammed earth, particularly those in Inner Mongolia, Gansu and Ningxia in northwest China, are deteriorating quickly, cracking, leaning or collapsing. It is estimated that without effective conservation, these sections will disappear altogether within 30 years.
See more about Current Situation of the Wall.

11. Huge Man-Made Damage since the 1960s

During the Cultural Revolution from 1960s to 1970s, miles of the Wall were vandalized or destroyed to make way for infrastructure construction. Many bricks were moved to build civilian houses or farms. From 1980s to 1990s, some people even pillaged the bricks and sold them. It was common to see the ramparts being reduced to give way to road or factory construction. There was no clear regulation on the conservation of the Wall until 2006.

12. The Wall is Sadly Called the Longest Cemetery in the World

In 2,500 years of construction history of the massive project, more than 1,000, 000 laborers had been used, including civilians, soldiers, and convicts. It was a special punishment for convicted criminals during the Qin (221 - 207BC) and Han (202BC - 220AD) Dynasties. The toilsome work took many lives. It is estimated that around 400,000 builders were died and some are said to be buried in the long wall. That gives the dreadful saying of the &lsquolongest cemetery&rsquo. Don&rsquot worry! So far, there has been no actual evidence of the walls containing corpses.
See more about the Labor Force.

13. Most Widely-Spread Legend &ndash The Cry of Meng Jiangnu

A tragic trivia is known to every household in China. Once there was a woman named Meng Jiangnu, whose husband Fan Xiliang was forcibly recruited to help build the Great Wall just three days after their marriage. Meng missed her husband so much that she decided to visit him. When she arrived at the building site, she was informed that Fan had died of exhaustion and been buried inside the wall. She was heart-broken and cried day and night. Finally, the wall collapsed and exposed her husband&rsquos bones.
See more about the story of Mengjiangnu's Bitter Weeping.

14. Westerners' First Acquaintance with the Wall in 4th Century

In 1987, the Great Wall was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site. Today, it is recognized as the emblem of China and attracts numerous international visitors. However, before the 20th century, it was seldom described in any Chinese artwork. To the contrary, a simple description about this wall can be found in historical materials of the ancient Rome early in the 4th century. Since the Ming Dynasty, this great architecture was gradually known by more Westerners. In a Portuguese writer's book 񟦋 Asia', it said that there was a long and solid wall in China with heavy garrison. In 1575, a Spanish envoy also commended the grand wall when he got back to Europe. In 1793, a British painter's picture marked the first appearance of the Great Wall in Western paintings. Since 20th century, the Wall gradually won popularity among tourists.
Further Reading: When Did the Great Wall Become Famous?

15. Special Binding Agent from Grain

The building materials of the walls included the rammed earth, bricks, stones and rocks. What was the mortar? Here comes a fun fact - it was totally different from the modern mixture of sand and cement, as it included glutinous rice flour. Processed rice flour served as a reliable adhesive.
See more about the Construction Materials.


Beijing Accessibility & Restrictions for Visitors

Beijing is conditionally open and can be visited by foreign travelers. If you are planning a trip to Beijing and want to know more details, please contact us. Alternatively, you can check our popular Beijing tours for inspiration.

1. What you will need to visit:

  • Green health code
  • Mask
  • Registration form for temporary residence (required by hotels)

2. If you come from areas with medium or high risk, you need to be quarantined for seven days.

3. Popular attractions that are open include (but are not limited to):

  • The Forbidden City (including indoor exhibition halls)
  • The Great Wall
  • The Temple of Heaven
  • The Summer Palace

Here are 20 facts you should know to really appreciate the Great Wall.


The Yuan Dynasty was the first dynasty controlled by non-Han people. Since the rulers themselves belonged to nomadic tribes, the Great Wall thus lost its meaning as a�nsive fortress. Besides, due to the Yuan Dynasty’s unparalleled power in the world, it did not need such a fortification, and hardlyꃊrried out any work on the Great Wall.

  • The construction never ceased,ਊnd thus the scale of the project became unparalleled in history.
  •  Most sections of the Great Wall we see today are the legacy of the Ming Dynasty, like Badaling and Mutianyu.

The Yuan Dynasty ended in persistent peasant uprisings led by Han people.It was finally replaced by the Ming Dynasty, with Zhu Yuanzhang, a peasant leader,ਊs its first ruler.Thanks to his peasant identity and experience of seizing power, Zhu particular attention to the construction of the Great Wall.

Over the two centuries of the Ming Dynasty, the building of�nsive fortifications never ceased,ਊnd thus the scale of the project became unparalleled in history.

In actual fact, most sections of the Great Wall we see today are the legacy of the Ming Dynasty, including the best preserved sections of Badaling and Mutianyu in the northern outskirts of Beijing.


Interesting facts about the Great Wall of China

History and facts about the Great Wall of China

  • Majority of the human labor that built the wall were soldiers and convicts.
  • About 400 thousand workers died during the construction of the wall. However, some historians claim that the number was around one million deaths. Many were buried within the wall.
  • The Great Wall is one of the best architectural ancient designs in history.
  • Parts of the wall were destroyed during the construction of new roads.
  • The Great Wall is a national pride for the Chinese.

Magnificent! Majestic! Intimidating! Glorious! Aside from being awe-struck, these are some of the adjectives that millions of annual visitors often use to describe the Great Wall of China. Undoubtedly, this monumental wonder will continue to elicit even stronger emotions for centuries to come.


Watch the video: Κίνα: Σινικό τείχος - China: Great Wall


Comments:

  1. Bratilar

    IMHO the meaning is fully developed, the writer squeezed out everything he could, for which my bow to him!

  2. Goltijin

    Excuse, the message is removed

  3. Mordke

    Great, very funny answer

  4. Gameel

    It's a pity that I can't speak now - I'm in a hurry to get to work. I will be back - I will definitely express my opinion on this issue.

  5. Ronald

    I congratulate, your idea is magnificent



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