History of Auk-AM-57 - History

History of Auk-AM-57 - History



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Auk

II

(AM-57: d p. 890, 1. 221'2"; b. 32'2"; dr. 10'9"; s. 18.1 k.; J. 105; a. 13", 2 40mm., 8 20mm.; cl. Auk)

The second Auk (AM-57) was laid down on 15 April 1941 at Portsmouth, Va., by the Norfolk Navy Yard; launched on 26 August; sponsored by Miss Priscilla Alden Hague, the daughter of Comdr. Wesley M. Hague; and commissioned on 15 January 1942, Lt. Comdr. George W. Allen in command.

After shakedown and training off the Virginia capes, the new minesweeper operated along the Atlantic coast until October when she received orders to join the Western Naval Task Force for Operation "Torch," the invasion of North Africa. She sortied from Norfolk on the 23d of that month as a part of the Center Attack Group, bound for Fedhala Roads just off the Moroccan coast. Shortly before midnight on 7 November the task force arrived in position and began disembarking troops for the landing at dawn on the 8th. Just a few minutes after 0500, a little French steamer escorted by the trawler Victoria blundered into the columns of transports offshore. Hogan (DMS-6) investigated the intruders, crossing the French trawler's bow and ordering him to reverse engines. For an answer, the scrappy little Frenchman tried to ram Hogan. The high speed minesweeper swept Victoria with 20-millimeter gunfire and stopped the trawler dead. Auk placed a prize crew on board then continued screening the transport area.

At 1200, Miantonomah (CMc-5) began laying a minefield to the east as a protection for the Center Attack Group. While screening the minelayer, Auk and Tillman (DD-Ml) engaged the Vichy French patrol vessel W-43 which was escorting six merchant and six fishing vessels through the transport area. They captured the corvette with a minimal amount of trouble and also took three of the other ships.

Auk worked out of Casablanca, French Morocco, operating as a convoy escort, a screening ship, and a harbor patrol boat until 11 April 1943, when she headed west with a homeward-bound convoy. Following her arrival at Charleston, S.C., on the 30th, the minesweeper proceeded to Norfolk for drydocking and overhaul. From June to April 1944, Auk escorted convoys from Norfolk and New York to ports in the Caribbean and along the gulf coast.

On 19 April, the minesweeper again headed eastward to prepare for Operation "Overlord," the invasion of Europe. Proceeding via the Azores and Milford Haven, Wales, she reached Plymouth, England, on the 29th. While in British waters, Auk joined other units of Mine Squadron (MinRon) 21 in practice sweeping operations.

Early on 4 June, she got underway to sweep mines in the Baie de la Seine, France, to prepare the way for the assault on Utah Beach, Normandy, scheduled for the 5th. Weather forced the
postponement of the landings until the following day, but one of Auk 's sister ships, Osprey (AM-56), hit a mine and sank. The invasion began on 6 June, and Auk remained off the beaches
until the 19th, sweeping nearby waters. She then returned to Plymouth for supplies. On 25 June, Auk returned to sweeping duties off Cherbourg, France, where she cleared a lane ahead of a major bombardment force including battleships Arkansas (BB-33), Texas (BB35), and Nevada (BB-36). Shortly after midday, enemy shore batteries opened fire on the sweepers. By 1230, every minesweeperincluding Auk-had been straddled by enemy salvos. Hampered by their five-knot top speed when streaming sweep gear, the minesweepers were ordered to retire out of range until the task force concluded its gunfire.

Between 29 June and 24 July, with the exception of brief runs to England for supplies, Auk continued sweeping operations in the Baie de la Seine. The sweeper sailed with MinRon 21 for Gibraltar on I August, transited the strait on the 5th, and briefly stopped at Oran, Algeria, on the 6th. From there, Auk proceeded to Naples, one of the staging points for the invasion of southern France.

When Operation "Dragoon" commenced on 15 August, Auk was off the designated beaches of Provence with Vice Admiral Hewitt's Control Force. She remained along the coast of southern France until 26 September, intermittently coming under fire by enemy coastal batteries while sweeping Baie de Cavalaire, Baie de Briande, Baie de Bon Porte, Marseille harbor, and waters off Toulon. Therefore, Auk continued minesweeping and patrol missions in the Mediterranean until 31 May 1945, when she headed for the United States.

Arriving in Norfolk on 15 June, she received an overhaul. The minesweeper remained in the Norfolk Navy Yard until 25 August. After leaving the yard, she conducted local training operations before sailing on 18 September. Proceeding through the Panama Canal, she reached San Pedro, Calif., on 9 October. However, instead of reporting for Pacific Fleet duty, Auk received orders for inactivation. She departed California on 26 November and headed for Portland, Oreg., where she was scheduled to undergo inactivation overhaul. Upon her arrival at that port, on 10 December, Auk found severely crowded conditions which resulted in new orders which sent the minesweeper back to San Diego where she moored on the last day of 1945.

Auk was decommissioned on 1 July 1946 and berthed with the reserve fleet at San Diego. In a general reclassification dated 7 February 1955, her hull designation was changed to MSF-57. Her name was struck from the Navy list on I August 1956. No record of her disposal has been found.

Auk (AM-57) earned three battle stars for her World War II service.


Auk-class minesweeper

The Auk class were Allied minesweepers serving with the United States Navy and the British Royal Navy during the Second World War. In total, there were 95 Auks built.

  • United States Navy
  • Royal Navy (under Lend-Lease)
  • Hellenic Navy
  • Philippine Navy
  • Republic of Korea Navy
  • Turkish Naval Forces
  • Mexican Navy
  • Republic of China Navy
  • 890 tons
  • 1,100 tons (full load)
  • 9–12 knots (17–22 km/h 10–14 mph) (cruising)
  • 18 knots (33 km/h 21 mph) (maximum)
  • 1 × 3 in (76 mm)/50 cal. gun
  • 2 × Bofors 40 mm guns
  • 8 × 20 mm Oerlikon cannons
  • 2 × depth charge tracks

USS Electra (AK 21)

USS Electra (AK 21) (Cdr James Joseph Hughes, USN) was participating in Operation Torch, the invasion of North Africa, in the Task Group 34.8 as part of convoy MKF-1. The ship had landed troops and material at Port Lyautey where many of her landing boats were lost.

At 07.40 hours on 15 Nov 1942 the unescorted USS Electra was hit on the starboard side in #3 hold by one torpedo from U-173 while steaming on a zigzag course at 14 knots off Casablanca. This hold and #2 hold flooded after a secondary explosion from ammunition carried as cargo. One passenger, an US Army sergeant, sleeping in #3 hold was killed. The ship immediately headed for the nearby coast until the engines stopped when water entered the engine room after 20 minutes. At 07.15 hours, the order was given to abandon ship and USS Cole (DD 155) (LtCdr G.G. Palmer, USN) came alongside to take off all crew members and passengers except a rescue party. Shortly thereafter the disabled ship was taken in tow by the tug USS Cherokee (AT 66) (Lt J.H. Lawson, USN) and USS Stansbury (DMS 8) (LtCdr J.B. Maher, USN). During the afternoon, the tow convoy was joined by USS Raven (AM 55) (LtCdr C.G. Rucker, USN) and USS Auk (AM 57) (LtCdr W.D. Ryan, USNR) to assist by pumping out the engine room and #2 hold. The next day USS Electra was docked by two French tugs in Casablanca Harbor, where she was unloaded and temporary repairs were carried out over the next months. On 11 April 1943, she left Casablanca in convoy under her own power and arrived at Charleston for permanent repairs on 30 April, returning to service as USS Electra (AKA 4) in July 1943.

Location of attack on USS Electra (AK 21).

ship damaged.

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RFA Red Dragon


2 July 1912 launched by Napier & Miller Ltd, Old Kilpatrick as Yard Nr: 186 named Y. DDRAIG GOCH, a large four masted auxiliary 1,400 ton yacht, for Mr Godfrey Williams of Aberpergwm - a member of the Royal Yacht Squadron

22 August 1912 Lloyds List newspaper reported -

25 October 1912 at Swansea registered as Y. DDRAIG GOCH under reference number 13/12 in the Registry

6 April 1913 at Falmouth, Cornwall Seaman Alexander Smith discharged dead - drowned

9 April 1913 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing west

9 April 1913 the Times newspaper published an article on the ship -

28 October 1913 berthed at Port Talbot

April 1918 entered Admiralty service

17 August 1918 Engineer Sub-Lieutenant Frederick L Angus DSM RNR appointed as officer in charge

Sub Lieutenant Frederick L Angus DSM RNR

11 December 1918 and 12 December 1918 at Devonport in No 3 Dock RFA PALMOL alongside pumping over her entire cargo of FFO

1919 used as an oil hulk at Devonport and Dartmouth

19 June 1919 at Devonport HMS CAMBRIAN alongside to refuel

HMS CAMBRIAN

3 February 1920 at Plymouth HMS CICALA berthed alongside to refuel

1 June 1944 at Plymouth USS ATR-13 and USS ATR-54 alongside to refuel. USS ATR-13 received 25,009 gallons of fuel oil and 370 gallons of diesel fuel

21 June 1944 at Plymouth USS Threat (AM-124) and USS Broadbill (AM-58) alongside to refuel

22 June 1944 at Plymouth USS AUK (AM-57) alongside to refuel

13 July 1944 at Plymouth USS Auk (AM57) and USS Broadbill (AM58) alongside to refuel

5 October 1944 at Plymouth USS ATR4 alongside to refuel

17 October 1944 at Plymouth USS Peterson (DE-152) alongside to refuel

USS Peterson (DE-152)

18 October 1944 at Plymouth a US Navy destroyer alongside to refuel

26 October 1944 at Cremyll, Plymouth USS Thornhill (DE195) alongside to refuel

11 November 1944 at Plymouth USS Dale W Peterson and USS Roy O Hale (DE336) alongside to refuel

21 November 1944 at Plymouth USS O'Reilly (DE330) alongside to be refuelled

27 November 1944 at Plymouth USS Thomas J Gary (DE326) alongside to refuel - received 41,352 gallons of diesel oil

3 December 1944 at Jenny Cliff Bay, Plymouth USS Ramsden (DE382) alongside to refuel. Details of this evolution shown copied from her War Diary of the day but submitted on 31 December 1944 -

13 December 1944 at Plymouth USS Thornhill (DE195) alongside to refuel

15 December 1944 at Plymouth USS Rinehart (DE196) alongside to refuel

21 December 1944 at Jenny Cliff Bay, Plymouth USS Clarence L Evans, USS Stewart (DE238) and USS Price (DE332) alongside to refuel

8 January 1945 at Plymouth USS Koiner (DE331) and USS Ricketts alongside to refuel

15 January 1945 at Jenny Cliff Bay, Plymouth USS Sellstrom (DE205) and USS Savage (DE386) alongside to refuel

29 January 1945 at Jenny Cliff Bay, Plymouth USS Earl K Olsen (DE765) alongside to refuel

USS Earl K Olsen (DE765)

7 February 1945 at Jenny Cliff Bay, Plymouth USS Clarence L Evans (DE113), USS Edsall (DE129) and HMCS Mina alongside to refuel

28 March 1952 at Devonport moved from 'moorings' to No 1 buoy by RFA Careful


Auk-class minesweepers

The Auk class were Allied minesweepers serving with the United States Navy and the British Royal Navy during the Second World War. In total, there were
USS Auk AM - 57 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water
total, there were a recorded 95 Auk class minesweepers under Allied command during that time. Thirty - two minesweepers were ordered by the US as BAM - 1
Raven class was a class of two World War II - era U.S. Navy minesweepers They were succeeded by the Auk class which were based on the Ravens. Minesweeper AM
now a popular site for scuba diving. List of Admirable - class minesweepers Auk - class minesweeper Russell, Richard A., Project Hula: Secret Soviet - American
The Douwe Aukes class were minelayers of the Royal Netherlands Navy, named after the naval hero Douwe Aukes The two ships were built at the Gusto shipyard
USS Pigeon AM - 374 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the
USS Portent AM - 106 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in
USS Pochard AM - 375 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in

The second USS Scoter AM - 381 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields
HMS Tattoo was an Auk - class minesweeper of the Royal Navy during the Second World War. She was laid down by Gulf Shipbuilding Corporation Chickasaw
AM - 316 MSF - 316 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy. Competent was a U.S. Navy oceangoing minesweeper named after the word
USS Shoveler AM - 382 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water
BAM - 1 AM - 314 MSF - 314 was an Auk - class minesweeper of the United States Navy. The ship was the first of 32 vessels of the Auk class ordered for transfer to
Catherine - class minesweeper of the Royal Navy during the Second World War. Originally planned as USS Usage AM - 130 of the United States Navy s Auk class she
USS Spear AM - 322 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the
USS Waxwing AM - 389 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in
USS Prevail AM - 107 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in
USS Token AM - 126 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the

USS Devastator AM - 318 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing naval mines from minefields laid in
USS Quail AM - 377 MSF - 377 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid
USS Broadbill AM - 58 was an Auk - class minesweeper of the United States Navy, named after the broadbill, a hunters nickname for the greater scaup, a
USS Swerve AM - 121 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the
USS Sentinel AM - 113 was an Auk - class minesweeper built for the United States Navy during World War II she was the third U.S. Naval vessel to bear the
USS Auk AM - 38 was a Lapwing - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy after World War I for the task of removing mines that had been placed during
USS Nuthatch AM - 60 was an Auk - class minesweeper in the United States Navy. Nuthatch was laid down at the Defoe Shipbuilding Company in Bay City, Michigan
USS Pheasant AM - 61 MSF - 61 was an Auk - class minesweeper named after the Pheasant, a large game bird found in the United States and other countries. Pheasant
Catherine - class minesweeper of the Royal Navy. The Catherine class was the British designation for the United States Navy s Auk class minesweeper She was

USS Oracle AM - 103 was an Auk - class minesweeper built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was commissioned in May 1943 and decommissioned
AM - 131 was an Auk - class minesweeper that served in both World War II and during the Korean War. As a steel - hulled fleet minesweeper she was assigned

  • The Auk class were Allied minesweepers serving with the United States Navy and the British Royal Navy during the Second World War. In total, there were
  • USS Auk AM - 57 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water
  • total, there were a recorded 95 Auk class minesweepers under Allied command during that time. Thirty - two minesweepers were ordered by the US as BAM - 1
  • Raven class was a class of two World War II - era U.S. Navy minesweepers They were succeeded by the Auk class which were based on the Ravens. Minesweeper AM
  • now a popular site for scuba diving. List of Admirable - class minesweepers Auk - class minesweeper Russell, Richard A., Project Hula: Secret Soviet - American
  • The Douwe Aukes class were minelayers of the Royal Netherlands Navy, named after the naval hero Douwe Aukes The two ships were built at the Gusto shipyard
  • USS Pigeon AM - 374 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the
  • USS Portent AM - 106 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in
  • USS Pochard AM - 375 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in
  • The second USS Scoter AM - 381 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields
  • HMS Tattoo was an Auk - class minesweeper of the Royal Navy during the Second World War. She was laid down by Gulf Shipbuilding Corporation Chickasaw
  • AM - 316 MSF - 316 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy. Competent was a U.S. Navy oceangoing minesweeper named after the word
  • USS Shoveler AM - 382 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water
  • BAM - 1 AM - 314 MSF - 314 was an Auk - class minesweeper of the United States Navy. The ship was the first of 32 vessels of the Auk class ordered for transfer to
  • Catherine - class minesweeper of the Royal Navy during the Second World War. Originally planned as USS Usage AM - 130 of the United States Navy s Auk class she
  • USS Spear AM - 322 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the
  • USS Waxwing AM - 389 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in
  • USS Prevail AM - 107 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in
  • USS Token AM - 126 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the
  • USS Devastator AM - 318 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing naval mines from minefields laid in
  • USS Quail AM - 377 MSF - 377 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid
  • USS Broadbill AM - 58 was an Auk - class minesweeper of the United States Navy, named after the broadbill, a hunters nickname for the greater scaup, a
  • USS Swerve AM - 121 was an Auk - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the
  • USS Sentinel AM - 113 was an Auk - class minesweeper built for the United States Navy during World War II she was the third U.S. Naval vessel to bear the
  • USS Auk AM - 38 was a Lapwing - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy after World War I for the task of removing mines that had been placed during
  • USS Nuthatch AM - 60 was an Auk - class minesweeper in the United States Navy. Nuthatch was laid down at the Defoe Shipbuilding Company in Bay City, Michigan
  • USS Pheasant AM - 61 MSF - 61 was an Auk - class minesweeper named after the Pheasant, a large game bird found in the United States and other countries. Pheasant
  • Catherine - class minesweeper of the Royal Navy. The Catherine class was the British designation for the United States Navy s Auk class minesweeper She was
  • USS Oracle AM - 103 was an Auk - class minesweeper built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was commissioned in May 1943 and decommissioned
  • AM - 131 was an Auk - class minesweeper that served in both World War II and during the Korean War. As a steel - hulled fleet minesweeper she was assigned

AM 57 Auk Glob.

1942 class of minesweepers of the United States Navy. Auk class minesweeper. In more languages. Spanish. No label defined. No description. Philippines retires former US minesweeper that earned five battle. 500 minesweepers and about 33.000 men in the Pacific mine force alone. For The last of the Auk and Admirable class ships, built in World War II and used. Auk class minesweeper Against All Odds Fandom. USS Chief AM 315 Class overview Name: Auk Operators. Mexican naval vessel at La Paz sunset Auk Class minesweeper. Some of these ships were transferred to the Royal Navy under Lend Lease, they were known as the Catherine class. All ships of the Auk class. Royal Navy more​.

A sailors memories of minesweeping during Korean War The.

The Auk class were Allied minesweepers serving with the United States Navy and the British Royal Navy during the Second World War. In total, there were 95 Auks built. HMS Fairy J403 Bronze Bridge Badge c1944 The Antiques. The Navys very first minesweeper was a bird boat, launching a 90 year series of Figure 4: RAVEN Class minesweeper USS OSPREY AM 56 off the. Norfolk Navy Yard USS AUK AM 38. USS CHEWINK AM 39.

Auk MSF 57 Navsource.

Name, Hull, Class, Commissioned, Fate. USS Ability, AM 519, Ability, 8 4 1958, Scrapped. USS Acme, AM 508, Acme, 9 27 1956, Sold, 1977. The Life & Service of a World War II Mine Warfare Sailor. Part 7. The wreck of the Auk class minesweeper HMS Pylades sunk by a German midget submarine during the night of July 8, 1944 while anchored as. Minesweeper AM Auk Class Models SD Model Makers. The wreck of the Auk class minesweeper HMS. Pylades sunk by a German midget submarine during the night of July 8, 1944 while anchored as part of the Trout.

USN Ships - USS Defense AM 317 Ibiblio.

HMS Elfreda J402 Auk class Minesweeper. 4 likes. A digital archive about the ship and crew that served on the ship between 1943 1946. World War II Honoree. The Auk class were Allied minesweepers serving with the United States Navy and the British Royal Navy during the Second World War. In total. Navy vet recalls serving in WWII The Hour. CLASS DESTROYER PATROL DUTY ATLANTIC FLEET. USS PIONEER AM ​105, A AUK CLASS MINESWEEPER ATLANTIC AND MEDITERRANEAN. Следующая Войти Настройки. Category:Auk class minesweeper media Commons. USS Hazard is an example of an Admirable class fleet minesweeper that fought against Japan in World War II. Admirable class minesweepers. 18 Desktop Replica of a Auk Class Minesweeper AM. Description. SKU. SDMM Minecraft AM AukClass 12 inch master. A total of 95 Auk class minesweepers were built during WW 2, to serve both the United States​.

Pin on Naval Warships Pinterest.

HMS Cato J 16 Ships Badge Auk class Minesweeper Unmounted One Off Casting This circular aluminium plaque is painted and depicts a white cat in​. February 2012 SEA SERVICES SCUTTLEBUTT. Subcategories. This category has the following 10 subcategories, out of 10 total. A. ▻ USS Auk AM 57 ‎ 1 F. C. ▻ Catherine class.

Auk class minesweeper pedia.

Here we see the beautiful Miguel Malvar class offshore patrol corvette BRP Cebu PS28 of the Philippine Navy on 3 October 2019, as she. Category:Auk class minesweepers pedia. As the only two ships of the Raven class minesweeper, they faced the USS Auk was one of 95 minesweepers built for the Auk class that.

From Dictionary of American Fighting Ships Haze Gray & Underway.

The Auk Class Minesweepers are minesweepers created by the Associated Shipbuilding Corporation and the Savannah Machine and Foundry Corporation for. D Day Mapping Mission Marine Technology News. USS Defense, an 890 ton Auk class minesweeper, was built at Alameda, California, and commissioned in January 1944. She served in the Pacific during World. Norfolk Naval Shipyard Supported D Day With Building. 9–12 knots 17–22 km h 10–14 mph cruising 18 knots 33 km h 21 mph maximum.

USS Impeccable AM320 Auk Class Minesweeper Minesweeper.

BRP Rizal former USS Murrelet Auk Class Minesweeper finally decommissioned. She was added to the Philippine fleet in 1965. Her sister ship USS Vigilance. Activity: The Math of War: The Numbers Behind Minesweeping in the. Launching of the USS Symbol Hull 1 AM 123, an Auk class minesweeper, at the Savannah Machinery and Foundry Co. The USS Symbol was a navy contract. Auk class minesweeper Enacademic. Minesweepers for the U. S. Navy, including Auk class minesweepers and The U.S.S. Symbol was an Auk class minesweeper. Her hull was.

PS Rizal Class Glob.

The Auk class displaced 890 tons on average, and had an approximate length of 220 225 feet. They could reach a maximum speed of about 18.1 knots 33.5. A STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES NAVYS MINESWEEPING. The USS Murrelet, an Auk class minesweeper that earned five battle stars during the Korean War, was retired in December 1965 and transferred.

Auk class Minesweepers Allied Warships of WWII.

The Winslow shipyard built two classes of minesweepers, the Auk class and the more popular Admirable class, accounting for the change in. Auk class minesweeper Visually. An Auk class minesweeper used to remove mines from minefields in Following two days of minesweeping in Leyte Gulf, Token anchored in. Veteran remembers 1944 just like it was yesterday County Life. Just off the workbench 18 Replica Model of an Auk Class Minesweeper The Auk class were Allied minesweepers serving with the United States Navy and the​.

Fred Jennings Vashon Maury Island Beachcomber.

Drive, twin screws, 3.500 hp 2.600 kW. WWII veteran recalls time overseas News gainesvil. The vessel was an auk class minesweeper. It could sweep three different types of mines, including acoustic and magnetic. My station at.

US Navy Bird Boats – Four Generations of Mine Warfare Ships.

Royal Navy Photograph of Castle class corvette HMS Denbigh Castle Former Auk class minesweeper still serving in the Philippine Navy as. Auk class data. Pages in category Auk class minesweepers. The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total. This list may not reflect recent changes learn more. Winchester, Randolph Chester County Hall of Heroes, PA. Auk class minesweeper. The Life & Service of a World War 2 Mine Warfare Sailor. Mexico La Paz Baja Mexican naval vessel at La Paz sunset Auk ​Class minesweeper ARM Valentin Gomez Farias P110.


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Contents

The Auk class displaced 890 tons on average, and had an approximate length of 220-225 feet. They could reach a maximum speed of about 18.1 knots (33.5 km/h). Auks were equipped with a single 3 inch gun, two 40 mm Bofors guns, and eight 20 mm Oerlikon guns.

Thirty-two minesweepers were ordered by the US (as BAM-1 to -32), intending them to be supplied to the Royal Navy under Lend-lease 12 were retained for USN use and given names and the "AM" hull classification prefix. [1] Those transferred to the RN were named as the Catherine class receiving "J" pennant number prefixes.

Eleven minesweepers of the Auk class were lost in World War II, six to direct enemy action including USS Skill, torpedoed by U-593.


Auk-class minesweeper

  • United States Navy
  • Royal Navy (under Lend-Lease)
  • Hellenic Navy
  • Philippine Navy
  • Republic of Korea Navy
  • Turkish Naval Forces
  • Mexican Navy
  • Republic of China Navy
  • 890 tons
  • 1,100 tons (full load)
  • 9–12 knots (17–22 km/h 10–14 mph) (cruising)
  • 18 knots (33 km/h 21 mph) (maximum)
  • 1 × 3 in (76 mm)/50 cal. gun
  • 2 × Bofors󈈜 mm guns
  • 8 × 20 mm Oerlikon cannons
  • 2 × depth charge tracks

The Auk class were Allied minesweepers serving with the United States Navy and the British Royal Navy during the Second World War. In total, there were 95 Auks built.


History of Auk-AM-57 - History

MINE DIVISION NINETEEN
Cmdr. C. C. Miller

HOGAN (DMS-6) (F)
Lt. Cmdr. J. L. Woodbury
HOWARD (DMS-7)
Lt. Cmdr. F. L. Tedder
STANSBURY (DMS-8)
Lt. Cmdr. R. N. McFarlane
PALMER (DMS-5) (RFF)
Lt. Cmdr. J.S.Blue
HAMILTON (DMS-18)**
Lt. Cmdr. H. O. Larson

MINE DIVISION TWENTY
No Commander Listed

ALBATROSS (AM-71) (F)
Lt. (jg) B. W. Evans D-M
BLUEBIRD (AM-72)
Lt. J. T. Baldwin, DV-(S)
FLICKER (AM-70)
Lt. (jg) R. Lagreze, D-V (G)
LINNET (AM-76)
Lt. T. Wolcott

MINE DIVISION TWENTY-ONE
No Commander Listed

RAVEN (AM-55) (F)
Lt. Cmdr. J. W. Stryker
OSPREY (AM-56)
Lt. Cmdr. C. L.Blackwell
AUK (AM-57)**
No C.O. Listed
BROADBILL (AM-58)**
No C.O. Listed
CHICKADEE (AM-59)**
No C.O. Listed
NUTHATCH (AM-60)**
No C.O. Listed
PHEASANT (AM-61)**
No C.O. Listed

MINE DIVISION TWENTY-TWO
No Commander Listed

OWL (AM-2) (F)
Lt. Cmdr. C. G. Rucker
BRANT (AM-24)**
Lt. Cmdr. L. M. Wise
CORMORANT (AM-40)**
Lt. Cmdr. P. S. Reynolds
PARTRIDGE (AM-16)
Lt. Cmdr. S. E. Kenney

MINE DIVISION TWENTY-THREE
No Commander Listed

DASH (AM-88) (F)
No C.O. Listed
DESPITE (AM-89)
No C.O. Listed
DIRECT (AM-90)
No C.O. Listed
DYNAMIC (AM-91)
No C.O. Listed
EFFECTIVE (AM-92)
No C.O. Listed
ENGAGE (AM-93)
No C.O. Listed

MINE DIVISION TWENTY-FOUR**
No Commander Listed

EXCEL (AM-94) (F)
No C.O. Listed
EXPLOIT (AM-95)
No C.O. Listed
FIDELITY (AM-96)
No C.O. Listed
FIERCE (AM-97)
No C.O. Listed
FIRM (AM-98)
No C.O. Listed
FORM (AM-99)
No C.O. Listed

MINE DIVISION TWENTY-FIVE
No Commander Listed

GOLDFINCH (AM-77) (F)
Lt. (jg) J. G. Thorburn, Jr., D-V (G)
GRACKLE (AM-73)
Lt. (jg) J. R. Fells, D-M
GULL (AM-74)
Lt. H. J. Burke, D-V (S)
KITE (AM-75)
Lt. Cmdr. G. L. Burns, D-V (S)

MINE DIVISION TWENTY-SIX
No Commander Listed

ACCENTOR (AMc-33) (F)
Lt. (jg) G. Abbott, D-V (S)
CHIMANGO (AMc-42)
Ens. L. T. G. Nicholas, D-V (G)
COTINGA (AMc-43)
Lt. S. W. Carr, D-V (G)
FULMAR (AMc-46)
Lt. (jg) A. Russell
JACAMAR (AMc-47)
Lt. (jg) W. P. Wrenn, D-V (S)
MARABOUT (AMc-50)
Lt. H. M. Larsen, D-M

MINE DIVISION TWENTY-SEVEN
No Commander Listed

ACME (AMc-61) (F)**
Lt. M. L. Whitford, D-V (S)
BARBET (AMc-38)**
Ens. S. T. Hotchkiss, D-V (G)
BRAMBLING (AMc-39)**
Ens. J. E. Johansen, D-M
DOMINANT (AMc-76)**
Lt. (jg) H. J. Theriault, D-M
ENERGY (AMc-78)**
Lt. (jg) J. L. Malone, DE-O
HEROIC (AMc-84)**
Lt. (jg) A. M. White, D-V (S)

MINE DIVISION THIRTY
No Commander Listed No C.O.'s listed

MINE DIVISION TWENTY-NINE
No Commander Listed No C.O.'s listed

MINE DIVISION TWENTY-EIGHT
No Commander Listed No C.O.'s listed

USCG GALATEA
Lt. H. J. Wuensch
USCG THETIS
Lt. G. H. Miller
USCG PANDORA
Lt. C. M. Speight
USCG TRITON
Lt. J. F. Jacot


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